coloradobikemaps

Maps + routes for the Colorado cyclist

Update–Little Dry Creek Open!

Well, finally. Another of the 5 or 6 people who follow this blog wrote last week to say that Little Dry Creek at Federal Blvd has been reopened after months and months of work on RTD’s G-Line, itself an exercise in delays and patience. The G-Line will run between Union Station and Arvada and Wheat Ridge but has been delayed by sticky software that makes the crossing gates unpredictable. At least the trail is now completely open and it’s possible to ride to Boulder on the US 36 Bikeway without a lot of machinations.

What’s missing are the all important signs to tell you when to leave the Little Dry Creek drainage to connect to the US 36 Bikeway. I rode up there to check it out this past weekend and found many signs pointing to religion and possibly salvation, but none that said “Boulder, this way.”

File Oct 09, 7 42 55 PM

Here’s the way it works (from Denver): Look for England Park and exit the trail there, onto Raleigh St. You’ll know you’re in the right general vicinity when you pass the dog park and see a baseball field, both on your left. Exit left onto Raleigh and ride to 72nd Ave. Go right, then immediately left to Bradburn and you’re home free. From a map perspective it looks thus:

Boulder Route

You’ll know you’re in the right spot when you see the sign for the various churches. Enjoy the ride and thanks to Ken for the pictures and the information.

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October 9, 2017 Posted by | Denver Metro, Uncategorized, Updates, Us 36 Bikeway | , , , | Leave a comment

Important Update: Chatfield Reservoir

One of the 5 or 6 readers of this blog recently wrote in to tell me that it’s impossible to ride from the end of the Highline Canal Trail through Chatfield to rejoin the road and make a nice loop ride back up the Platte River Trail. What I’ve said here and in last year’s map is that you can dodge the traffic on Santa Fe/US 85 (it’s an unprotected crossing), hike your bike across the railroad tracks (probably illegal), and ride or walk down a sketchy trail to hook up with a paved trail within the park. When I last did (May, 2016) it was a mess, as evidenced by this IG shot I took:Chatfield Mess

I assumed at the time this was just bad luck on my part. There had been rain, lots of run-off, and I like a little dirt and gravel on my rides, so I just chalked it up to bad timing.

Turns out we have beavers to thank for the watery mess.

American_Beaver

As Andrew put it: “[I] discovered the trail in this part of the park is currently impassible due to flooding. I spoke with another cyclist who said it has been this way for about a year and is caused by a beaver dam on Plum Creek, which the park has been reticent to damage (understandably). There are no good alternatives to complete the loop — High Line ends at private land before getting a rider to Titan Pkway.”

Chatfield for blog

I hope I’m not the only one to see a rich irony in the work of the mighty Army Corps of Engineers laid low by the humble beaver. So unless and until they move on, ride the rough gravel trail along the top of the dam to connect up to the Highline Canal. And thanks, Andrew, for letting us know.

October 7, 2017 Posted by | Denver Metro, Douglas County, Updates | , , , | Leave a comment